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- Telling Fortunes By Tea Leaves - 3/23 -


when it may be found quite different.

It is of course a great mistake to be always "looking in the tea-leaves," as some foolish people do twice a day. It is sure to lead to contradictions though there is no harm in the habit of "looking in the cup" each morning as others do, for finding the events likely to happen in the course of the day. This is as permissible as the reading of the cards each morning for the day's events by those who consider it a safeguard, remembering that to be forewarned is to be forearmed.

Some people use the tea-cup simply for the purpose of asking a definite question, such as, "Is the sum of money I am expecting coming soon?" When this is the case, the consultant should be told before turning the cup in the hand to concentrate the thoughts on this one point, as in the case of wishing while shuffling the cards for a definite wish. Then the seer must look only for the signs that will give the answer to the question, ignoring all other points. This is necessary for the giving of a satisfactory answer to the question asked.

CHAPTER IV

DIVINATION BY TEA-LEAVES AS AN AMUSEMENT AND AS A MORE SERIOUS STUDY

The need for patience cannot be too strongly impressed upon those who are beginning to learn the language of tea-leaves. Some of the most interesting symbols are very minute, and will certainly be missed by the seer who is in a hurry.

When tea-leaf reading is indulged in merely as an amusement to while away a few moments after a meal, a hasty glance at the cup, or cup and saucer, will suffice. The seer will just note the chief features, such as a journey, a letter, a parcel, or news of a wedding, and pass on to the next cup. But this is far from being a really interesting method of divination by tea-leaves, wherein so much knowledge is to be found, and so much useful information gained.

Those who closely study this fascinating subject will certainly be well rewarded by a deep personal interest, in addition to the pleasure they give to others.

It is wonderful how rapidly converts are made to this form of divination. Some who in the past have been heard scornfully to assert that they "have no belief in tea-leaves," become the most regular inquirers. Moreover, these sceptics have proved to be very efficient students.

There is always a satisfaction in persuading another to one's own point of view. The more obstinate the opposition, the more glorious the final conquest!

It is a rare occurrence nowadays to meet with three people in the course of a day, and not to find that one at least is deeply interested in fortune-telling in some of its various forms.

Quite recently I had a letter from a girl who has gone on a visit to British Columbia, asking me if I would "do the cards" for her, as she could not find anyone in her vicinity who was particularly good at divination. She went on to say that "there is a perfect rage for fortune-telling out here, and everyone is keen on it." Another instance of this universal popularity was given to me by a friend who had recently been to America. She was amazed at the numbers of women whom she saw absorbed in the reading of their tea-cups each day of the voyage.

The male sex holds aloof and leaves us to "perform these follies." Some ascribe it to man's superiority. Or as briefly summed up by a delightful member of their sex, who when declaiming against the possibility of the future being made visible, said, "With all apologies to you, I must say I am not so profoundly stupid as to believe in these things; it cannot be anything more than rot."

It is remarkable how such protests die away when clairvoyant evidence, either by cards, tea-leaves, or other means, has accurately predicted some event of the distant future that at the time appeared absurd and impossible of happening.

Woman may lawfully claim superiority with regard to her intuitive faculty, and thus she is well equipped for exercising her divinatory powers.

Who need be dull or bored when the language of symbolism remains to be learned? Perhaps I should say, studied; for completely learned it can never be, seeing that fresh events are constantly occurring in the world, and new symbols appear representing each.

There are few things more fascinating than personal discovery, and those who become students of divination by tea-leaves, or cards, may safely be promised a taste of this pleasing sensation of achievement. It is limited to the few to discover the marvels of radium, or the discomforts of the South Pole, but a fragment of their glory is shared by those who find new evidence of the far-reaching knowledge of symbolism.

CHAPTER V

SOME HINTS FOR DIVINERS

REMARKABLE INSTANCES OF PROPHECY BY THE TEA-LEAVES

"For a man's mind is sometimes wont to tell him more than seven watchmen that sit above in a high tower."

To those of an inquiring or doubting turn of mind, there may arise the very natural question as to _why_ one shaped tea-leaf should mean "a hat" and another "a table." It is useless to point out that these objects are perfectly represented by the leaves. That is of no practical satisfaction. The simple fact that each language has its alphabet, its spelling, and its words, which must be learned before there can be any reasonable understanding of it, seems the best and obvious reply.

Symbolism is a wide subject with many branches. Who can expect to master even its alphabet in a moment? To those who cannot accept the symbols in the tea-leaves on the authority of past experience, reaching over several centuries, I would recommend a careful study of their cups for, say, three months. Let them make notes of such signs as appear and beside them place their meanings and predictions.

At the end of this time, compare all that has taken place with these notes, and I think there will be no further lack of faith in the tea-leaf symbols.

Before very many years have passed the language of symbolism by cards, tea-leaves, crystal gazing, etc., will probably be almost universally understood. The day will undoubtedly come when it will be accepted as naturally as the English language, and we shall cease to worry ourselves as to the why and wherefore of it all.

It is important that those who are learning the art of divination by tea-leaves should realise the necessity for consistently attributing the same meanings to the symbols. Do not be tempted to change their interpretation for what may seem a more probable, or pleasant, prediction for your client. It is a fatal mistake.

Remember that you are dealing with conditions and events of the future which are outside the limited knowledge of the normal mind, whose power of vision is limited to physical sight.

A simple instance of what may occur, should you thus change the meanings of the symbols, will suffice to show the folly of such a practice.

A consultant comes to have her "fortune read." She is known to you personally, and you are aware that she is anxious to hear a hopeful report of someone dear to her who is ill. The tea-leaf symbols are obstinately unfavourable, and display ominous signs of forthcoming sorrow. If you gloss over this fact completely, and predict a rapid recovery from the illness, what becomes of your client's faith in the power of foretelling the future? Certain it is that the symbols would be right in their verdict, and you would be wrong.

It is usually easier to prophesy smooth things rather than unpleasant facts, but to do this in the face of obvious contradictions will lead to disaster in foretelling the future.

Divination by tea-leaves or cards has the candour to be frankly disagreeable when necessary. This is one great argument in favour of its unerring truthfulness. There is no means by which symbols may be coaxed into proclaiming false statements.

The most practised clairvoyant may occasionally make mistakes in her reading of the symbols, but no genuine seer should ever deliberately give a wrong interpretation of them to please her consultant. The business of the diviner is to give what she believes to be a correct and unprejudiced translation of the symbols before her.

It is sometimes a vexed question as to what extent information of a gloomy nature, which may appear in a divination, should be given to a client. Some are in favour of withholding such matter altogether, whilst others announce it frankly without modification. It seems impossible to lay down any hard and fast rule. There are so many things to be taken into account, and each case should be treated on its merits and according to its peculiar circumstances. There are some who would fret themselves ill at the least mention of coming misfortune, others would be the better prepared to meet it by having been warned of its approach.

One rule can be safely made for guidance on this point. Do not minimise danger when a timely warning may avert an accident, or other misfortune, nor should symbols of ill omen be exaggerated. As students become proficient, they will find many meanings in the tea-leaves in addition to those which they learn from this book. Much will depend upon circumstances and individual temperaments.

These personally discovered meanings should be carefully noted and verified with events as they occur.

It is necessary to remember that divination by the tea-cup is by no means limited to personal information. Forthcoming public events are frequently revealed. This adds largely to the interest and usefulness of the divination. It is important to point out this to consultants, so that they may not be too ready to fix the whole reading of their cups to purely personal matters. It will be found that public news is usually foretold in the cups of those who seek information of the future as a regular practice.


Telling Fortunes By Tea Leaves - 3/23

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