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- Telling Fortunes By Tea Leaves - 4/23 -


For those who rarely do so, private affairs alone will appear, probably without even a forecast of the weather to be expected within the next few days.

It is a curious fact that the wider knowledge should seem to be reserved for those who practise divination constantly, but so it is.

Some remarkable instances of the accurate foretelling of public events, which have quite recently been brought to my notice, may be interesting.

For some weeks before the coal strike of 1920 was declared, a pickaxe was seen on several occasions in the cups of two persons, both of whom read their tea-leaves regularly. This symbol, as will be seen in the dictionary which follows, stands for "labour trouble and strikes." A spade was also in evidence at intervals, a further sign of "trouble and unrest." So that it was through no fault of the tea-leaves if some of us were not in the superior position of knowing all about the strike before it came to pass.

The symbols already mentioned would of course apply equally to railway disturbance, and some time before the threat of a strike was announced, these symbols appeared again, together with an engine, and a signal at the angle of "Danger." This seemed ominous. But within a few days the signal was evident once more; but on this occasion set at "All Clear." So it was easy to decide that the threatened strike would not take place. The accuracy of this prediction by means of the tea-leaves was shortly afterwards made evident.

Again, a week before there seemed to be even a hope of a settlement of the coal strike, a mining shaft presented itself in one of the tea-cups which had previously been indicating the strike. This symbol appeared at the top of the cup standing out clearly by itself, evidently predicting the miners' return to work within a short time. There was no need to depend upon information from the newspapers as to the end of the strike, for here in the tea-leaves was all necessary evidence of the fact.

Another very remarkable instance of symbolism was given to me by a friend a short time ago. On Monday morning, October 26th, 1920, the three following symbols appeared in her cup:--

A vulture resting on a rock. An eagle. A monkey.

In the evening of that day the death of King Alexander of Greece was announced.

It will be seen, on referring to the dictionary, that an eagle and a vulture signify "the death of a monarch." The monkey who lay at the bottom of the cup, apparently dead, was of course the third symbol as having caused the King's death. It was particularly gratifying that these signs should have appeared in my friend's cup for she is a mathematical genius, and rejects every symbol which she cannot recognise at once. She was so struck by these signs that she called them to the attention of her mother, who also immediately perceived and identified them. The only regrettable omission was that the cup was not photographed. It would have been valuable evidence for the wonders of the tea-leaves.

This same friend had another interesting experience. The head of an Indian appeared in her cup, with other signs pointing to news of a personal nature. She was puzzled, for, as far as she knew, there was no one in India from whom she would be in the least likely to hear.

Very shortly afterwards, however, her mother went on a visit to London. There she quite unexpectedly met someone who had recently come from India, and who had brought back messages of remembrance and affection from a girl who my friend had no idea was in India at that time. Hence the Indian in her tea-cup!

Whilst on this subject, I am reminded of another occasion when India was represented in the tea-leaves. I was looking into my tea-cup one day, when I saw most clearly depicted two natives creeping stealthily, their attitude making this evident. In their hands were what appeared to be knives, and they were making towards a figure that was unmistakably that of an officer. He was standing upon what looked like a raised platform with a barricade round him. He held a revolver in his hand.

I am quite aware that some may think this a tall tale for the tea-leaves to relate! But fortunately my reading of the cup was witnessed by two others, one of them being a man, who, although interested in psychic subjects, despises the tea-leaves! Without remarking upon what I saw, I suggested that he should look at my cup and see what he made of it. Without a moment's hesitation he said, "There is an officer defending himself against some natives who are about to attack him."

My readers will appreciate the satisfaction this testimony gave me, coming as it did from one who had never before looked into a cup. Moreover, that this witness should have been one of the male sex added to its value! This prediction of danger for someone in India was borne out by facts that were disclosed shortly afterwards. These instances which I have given illustrate the variety and interest which are to be found in divination by tea-leaves.

CHAPTER VI

WRITING IN THE TEA-LEAVES

SOME FREQUENT SYMBOLS

Another source through which messages are received by the tea-leaves will be found in the writing which will be seen from time to time. Moreover, it has the great advantage of being clear and easy to decipher, so that there may be no doubt of what is intended to be understood by it. The tea-leaves can never be accused of being illegible. Occasionally it is very minute writing, and would probably be passed over by those who read their cups in a superficial manner. To those who study them carefully the future is revealed.

No one would reasonably expect to find a speech from the Prime Minister or an invitation to a tea-party written for them in the tea-leaves. But words they certainly will find.

A short time ago I saw in my cup, in perfect copperplate writing, the word "wait." I was annoyed by it, for what is more annoying than having to wait? Sometimes it may happen that the tea-leaves--as with their relatives, the tumbler and automatic writing--become a little shaky in their spelling. But this is not a serious defect, and the trifling errors do not prevent the word from being translatable. It is a recognised fact that writing seen through a medium, whether it be tea-leaves, or a dream, is of importance, and should always be regarded with attention and with an endeavour to understand its message.

I should like to point out that certain figures and symbols are of so frequent occurrence that it may be well to emphasise their general significance by referring to them here, in addition to their meaning being given in the dictionary.

Among those which threaten misfortune, or sorrow, are the following: Crosses, snakes, spades, pistols, guns, toads, cats.

Joy and success are indicated by such symbols as a crescent moon, clover leaves, flowers, trees, anchors, fruit, circles, stars.

Having learned the symbols and the combined symbols by heart, it will require only a little practice to interpret their meanings without hesitation. For those who find difficulty in committing the dictionary to memory, an essential for proficient reading of the cup, I would suggest that they write down any meaning which may seem specially hard to remember, roughly drawing its symbol beside it. In this way the difficulty will soon be overcome.

CHAPTER VII

THE "NELROS" CUP

TWO EXAMPLE READINGS OF ITS SIGNS

"If thou wouldst learn thy future with thy tea, This magic cup will show it thee."

Some readers may find an additional interest in divination by tea-leaves, if they use a cup marked with the planetary symbols, patented as the "Nelros Cup of Fortune." A short explanation of the symbols, and the method of using this cup, will be helpful for those who are not familiar with its signs. I am not suggesting the use of the "Nelros" saucer, for the reason that its signs are somewhat obscure, and students who have no experience in the science of astrology would find it confusing, if used in addition to the cup, in which all needful signs are illustrated.

As in the case of the ordinary tea-cup, the handle remains as the representative of the consultant. The turning of it and draining of the moisture should be carried out in the usual way.

Immediately under the handle, and above the space given to the Sun, are seen a Diamond and a Horseshoe. Next on the left are a Snake twisted round a stick, and a Spade, these being placed over the space given to Saturn.

Following them are a Bell and a Club, seen over the sign of Venus. Next, an Eye and Envelope, above the space given to Jupiter.

Then comes a Cross, with the sign of Pisces, the Fishes, these being over the sign of Mercury.

Next are a Winecup and a Spider above the space of Mars.

Followed by a Cat's Head and a Heart, above the Moon.

Each one of these signs round the brim has a symbolic meaning, though their meaning must also be judged by the position they occupy in the cup.

Now, taking the signs round the brim of the cup, and connecting them with the planetary symbols beneath.

Beginning at the handle is a Diamond, this being a token of wealth, which, with the sign of the Sun below, indicates much prosperity, favours, and general well-being, the Horseshoe over the Sun also betokening good luck and successful projects.


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