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- Chess Strategy - 30/68 -


defence of the points weakened by the disappearance of the KtP, and how White pushes home his advantage in the one instance with the help of the B, in the other by the co-operation of the Kt.

I. 1. B-KKt5, B-KKt5; 2. Kt-Q5, Kt-Q5; 3. Q-Q2, BxKt?; 4. BxKt, PxB; 5. Q-R6, and there is no reply to the threat of KtxPch and QxP mate, except through the sacrifice of the Q. Forcing the exchange of Knights is of no avail, for after 5. ... Kt-K7ch; 6. K-R1, BxPch; 7. KxB, Kt-B5ch; 8. KtxKt, PxKt; 9. K-R1, White occupies the Kt file first and wins easily: 9. ... K-R1; 10. R- KKt1, R-KKt1; 11. RxR, QxR; 12. R-KKt1 followed by mate or loss of the Queen.

II. 3. Q-Q2, P-B3; 4. KtxKtch, PxKt; 5. B-R4! BxKt; 6. Q- R6, Kt-K7ch; 7. K-R1, BxPch; 8. KxB, Kt-B5ch; 9. K-R1, Kt-Kt3. Now Black has succeeded in interrupting the White Queen's action on the BP. But it has taken many moves, with the sole result that Black's Queen's Knight is better placed. All the other pieces, however, occupy the positions they took up in the opening. The Black Knight, moreover, is only supported by the RP until Black manages to block the White Bishop's diagonal by P-Q4. Meanwhile White has gained a big start, and is ready to occupy the open file with his Rooks. The sequel might be: 10. P-Q4!, BxP (if PxP; 11. P-K5!!, QPxP; 12. R-KKt1, etc.); 11. P-B3, B-Kt3; 12. QR-Q1, K-R1; 13. R-KKt1, Q-K2; 14. R-Q3, R-KKt1; 15. R-R3, R-Kt2 (KtxB; 16. QxRPch!!); 16. R-B3, followed by BxP (B6).

Taking it all in all, we see from the foregoing that the pinning of the Black Knight can only be injurious to Black if he does not take timely measures to provide against White's Kt-Q5, which threatens to concentrate more forces for the attack on KB6 than Black is able to mobilise for its defence.

Beginners, after having experienced frequent trouble through their inadequate defence of this kind of attack, try to avoid their recurrence by making such pinning moves impossible from the first and playing P-R3 on whichever side the pin is threatened. Apart from the loss of time, on which I remarked at length when discussing the opening, such pawn moves have various other drawbacks.

With every pawn move it should be considered whether the squares protected by the pawn before it has moved may not need the support of that pawn at a later stage. This is particularly the case with regard to squares in front of the castled King. If one of those pawns pushes on, the squares which have lost its protection frequently offer an opening for a direct attack by the enemy's pieces on the King.

A second consideration is the fact that the advancing pawn itself becomes a target for an assault in which the opponent, moving up a pawn on the next file, brings his Rooks into play, or in which he sacrifices a piece for the advanced pawn and the one that protects it, thus robbing the King of the protection he sought to obtain in castling.

The following examples will contribute much to the understanding of this most important subject, the grasp of which will mean a great step forward for the student.

The position in Diagram 93 is from a game v. Scheve-Teichmann (Berlin, 1907). White played 1. P-R3 in order to avoid the pinning of his Knight through B-Kt5. The move is not unjustified, as the Knight is required for the support of the square at Q4. The pawn move, however, has the drawbacks enumerated above, and White must think of keeping a sufficiency of pieces for the fight on the King's wing, in order to prevent Black from utilising the weakness thus created for a combined assault by superior forces.

--------------------------------------- 8 | #R | | #B | | #K | | #Kt| #R | |---------------------------------------| 7 | #B | #P | #P | | #Q | #P | #P | #P | |---------------------------------------| 6 | #P | | #Kt| #P | | | | | |---------------------------------------| 5 | ^P | | | | #P | | | | |---------------------------------------| 4 | | | ^B | ^P | ^P | | | | |---------------------------------------| 3 | | | ^P | | | ^Kt| | | |---------------------------------------| 2 | | ^P | | | | ^P | ^P | ^P | |---------------------------------------| 1 | ^R | ^Kt| ^B | ^Q | | ^R | ^K | | --------------------------------------- A B C D E F G H

Diag. 93

In this case White does not take precautionary measures, and succumbs in a surprisingly short time.

1. ... Kt-B3; 2. PxP? With this move White opens the diagonal for Black's KB for no apparent reason. 2. ... QKtxP; 3. KtxKt? Instead of providing for the defence of his King's wing, White exchanges one of the King's side pieces, 3. ... QxKt; 4. Kt-Q2, BxP! White has provoked this sacrifice by his last two moves. The KBP is pinned, and the Q enters by way of her Kt6, the protection of which was given up by pushing on the RP. The rest is easy; 5. PxB, Q-Kt6ch; 6. K-R1, QxPch; 7. K-Kt1, Kt-Kt5; 8. Kt-B3, Q- Kt6ch; 9. K-R1, BxP; 10. resigns.

Diagram 94 shows a position from a game Marshall-Burn (Ostend, 1907). Strong in the knowledge that the Black Queen's side pieces are not developed, and can only with difficulty be of assistance in the defence of the King's side because of their limited mobility, White takes advantage of the weakness created by the advance of the Black KKt pawn to his third, and initiates an immediate assault on the King's stronghold.

--------------------------------------- 8 | #R | | #B | #Q | | #R | #K | | |---------------------------------------| 7 | #P | #P | #P | #Kt| #P | #P | #B | #P | |---------------------------------------| 6 | | | | #P | | #Kt| #P | | |---------------------------------------| 5 | | | | | | | | | |---------------------------------------| 4 | | | | ^P | | ^B | | | |---------------------------------------| 3 | | | | ^B | ^P | ^Kt| | | |---------------------------------------| 2 | ^P | ^P | ^P | ^Kt| | ^P | ^P | ^P | |---------------------------------------| 1 | ^R | | | ^Q | ^K | | | ^R | --------------------------------------- A B C D E F G H

Diag. 94

1. P-KR4, R-K1; 2. P-R5. This forces open the Rook's file. If the pawn were still at Kt2, Black would simply let White push on to R6 and then reply with P-KKt3. 2. ... KtxP; 3. RxKt, White concludes the game in brilliant style. Black's wrong development has given a welcome opportunity for sacrificial combinations. Now the KB has an open diagonal, the pawn position is broken, and White's Q and R have no difficulty in using the Rook's file for a deadly attack. 3. ... PxR; 4. BxPch, KxB; 5. Kt-Kt5ch, K-Kt3 (if K-Kt1, then 6. QxP, Kt-B3; 7. QxPch, K-R1; 8. Castles, etc.); 6. QKt-B3, P-K4; 7. Kt-R4ch, K-B3; 8. Kt-R7ch, K-K2; 9. Kt-B5ch, K- K3; 10. KtxBch, K-K2; 11. Kt-B5ch, K-K3; 12. P-Q5ch, KxKt; 13. QxPch, K-K5; 14. Castles, followed by P-B3 or R-Q4 mate.

In cases where both sides have already castled on the same wing, and the opponent has weakened his position by pushing on one of the pawns of that wing, it is seldom advisable to start an attack with the advance of one of the pawns in front of the King, as the latter's position would be weakened. An attack of this kind is only justified if there is a prospect of concentrating with all speed a superior force before the opponent has time for a counter attack.

The Black position in Diagram 95 illustrates one much favoured by "natural" players. Here the advance of the

--------------------------------------- 8 | #R | | | #Q | | #R | #K | | |---------------------------------------| 7 | #P | #B | #P | #P | #Kt| #P | #B | #P | |---------------------------------------| 6 | | #P | #Kt| | #P | | #P | | |---------------------------------------| 5 | | | | | ^P | | | | |---------------------------------------| 4 | | | | ^P | | | | | |---------------------------------------| 3 | | | ^Kt| ^B | ^B | ^Kt| | | |---------------------------------------| 2 | ^P | ^P | ^P | | | ^P | ^P | ^P | |---------------------------------------| 1 | ^R | | | ^Q | | ^R | ^K | | --------------------------------------- A B C D E F G H

Diag. 95

KRP would not be a suitable plan of attack for White as his Rook is no longer on the Rook's file, nor could it be brought back in time. In this case White must endeavour to take advantage of the weaknesses at Black's KB3 and KR3, produced by his move P-KKt3. This will be the modus operandi: Q-Q2 followed by B-R6, forcing the exchange of Black's valuable KB. After that the Q in conjunction with one of the Knights will attempt to force an entry at KB6 or KR6, as for instance in the following, the moves of which are taken from a game I once watched and took note of as being most instructive.

1. Q-Q2, P-Q3; 2. B-KR6, PxP; 3. BxB, KxB; 4. PxP, Q-Q2; 5. Kt- K4, Kt-Q4; 6. B-B4, QR-Q1; 7. BxKt, PxB; 8. Kt-B6, Q-K3; 9. Q- Kt5, B-B1 (to prevent Kt-Kt4); 10. QR-K1, Q-B4; 11. Q-R4, P-KR3; 12. Kt-Q4, KtxKt; 13. QxKt, P-B4; 14. Q-Q2, P-Q5; 15. P-KB4, P- B5; 16. P-KKt4, Q-K3; 17. P-B5, Q-B3; 18. R-K4, B-Kt2; 19. R-B3!, Q-B4; 20. QxPch, KxQ; 21. R-R3ch, followed by R-R7 or Kt-R7 mate.

A somewhat more difficult case is shown in Diagram 96.

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Chess Strategy - 30/68

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