Schulers Books Online

books - games - software - wallpaper - everything

Bride.Ru

Books Menu

Home
Author Catalog
Title Catalog
Sectioned Catalog

 

- Roast Beef, Medium - 1/28 -


ROAST BEEF, MEDIUM

THE BUSINESS ADVENTURES OF EMMA McCHESNEY

BY EDNA FERBER

Author of "Dawn O'Hara," "Buttered Side Down," Etc.

With twenty-seven illustrations by James Montgomery Flagg

[Illustration: "'And they call that thing a petticoat!'"]

FOREWORD

Roast Beef, Medium, is not only a food. It is a philosophy.

Seated at Life's Dining Table, with the Menu of Morals before you, your eye wanders a bit over the entrees, the hors d'oeuvres, and the things _a la_, though you know that Roast Beef, Medium, is safe, and sane, and sure. It agrees with you. As you hesitate there sounds in your ear a soft and insinuating Voice.

"You'll find the tongue in aspic very nice today," purrs the Voice. "May I recommend the chicken pie, country style? Perhaps you'd relish something light and tempting. Eggs Benedictine. Very fine. Or some flaked crab meat, perhaps. With a special Russian sauce."

Roast Beef, Medium! How unimaginative it sounds. How prosaic, and dry! You cast the thought of it aside with the contempt that it deserves, and you assume a fine air of the epicure as you order. There are set before you things encased in pastry; things in frilly paper trousers; things that prick the tongue; sauces that pique the palate. There are strange vegetable garnishings, cunningly cut. This is not only Food. These are Viands.

"Everything satisfactory?" inquires the insinuating Voice.

"Yes," you say, and take a hasty sip of water. That paprika has burned your tongue. "Yes. Check, please."

You eye the score, appalled. "Look here! Aren't you over-charging!"

"Our regular price," and you catch a sneer beneath the smugness of the Voice. "It is what every one pays, sir."

You reach deep, deep into your pocket, and you pay. And you rise and go, full but not fed. And later as you take your fifth Moral Pepsin Tablet you say Fool! and Fool! and Fool!

When next we dine we are not tempted by the Voice. We are wary of weird sauces. We shun the cunning aspics. We look about at our neighbor's table. He is eating of things French, and Russian and Hungarian. Of food garnished, and garish and greasy. And with a little sigh of Content and resignation we settle down to our Roast Beef, Medium.

E. F.

CONTENTS

I. ROAST BEEF, MEDIUM II. REPRESENTING T. A. BUCK III. CHICKENS IV. HIS MOTHER'S SON V. PINK TIGHTS AND GINGHAMS VI. SIMPLY SKIRTS VII. UNDERNEATH THE HIGH-CUT VEST VIII. CATCHING UP WITH CHRISTMAS IX. KNEE-DEEP IN KNICKERS X. IN THE ABSENCE OF THE AGENT

ILLUSTRATIONS

"'And they call that thing a petticoat!'"

"'Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers,' he announced, glibly"

"'That was a married kiss--a two-year-old married kiss at least'"

"'I won't ask you to forgive a hound like me'"

"'You'll never grow up, Emma McChesney'"

"'Well, s'long then, Shrimp. See you at eight'"

"'I'm still in a position to enforce that ordinance against pouting'"

"'Son!' echoed the clerk, staring"

"'Well!' gulped Jock, 'those two double-bedded, bloomin', blasted Bisons--'"

"'Come on out of here and I'll lick the shine off your shoes, you blue-eyed babe, you!'"

"'You can't treat me with your life's history. I'm going in'"

"'Now, Lillian Russell and cold cream is one; and new potatoes and brown crocks is another'"

"'Why, girls, I couldn't hold down a job in a candy factory'"

"'Honestly, I'd wear it myself!'"

"'I've lived petticoats, I've talked petticoats, I've dreamed petticoats--why, I've even worn the darn things!'"

"And found himself addressing the backs of the letters on the door marked 'Private'"

"'Shut up, you blamed fool! Can't you see the lady's sick?'"

"At his gaze that lady fled, sample-case banging at her knees"

"In the exuberance of his young strength, he picked her up"

"She read it again, dully, as though every selfish word had not already stamped itself on her brain and heart"

"'Not that you look your age--not by ten years!"'

"'Christmas isn't a season ... it's a feeling; and, thank God, I've got it!'"

"No man will ever appreciate the fine points of this little garment, but the women--"

"Emma McChesney ... I believe in you now! Dad and I both believe in you'"

"It had been a whirlwind day"

"'Emma,' he said, 'will you marry me?'"

'"Welcome home!' she cried. 'Sketch in the furniture to suit yourself"'

I

ROAST BEEF, MEDIUM

There is a journey compared to which the travels of Bunyan's hero were a summer-evening's stroll. The Pilgrims by whom this forced march is taken belong to a maligned fraternity, and are known as traveling men. Sample-case in hand, trunk key in pocket, cigar in mouth, brown derby atilt at an angle of ninety, each young and untried traveler starts on his journey down that road which leads through morasses of chicken _a la_ Creole, over greasy mountains of queen fritters made doubly perilous by slippery glaciers of rum sauce, into formidable jungles of breaded veal chops threaded by sanguine and deadly streams of tomato gravy, past sluggish mires of dreadful things _en casserole_, over hills of corned-beef hash, across shaking quagmires of veal glace, plunging into sloughs of slaw, until, haggard, weary, digestion shattered, complexion gone, he reaches the safe haven of roast beef, medium. Once there, he never again strays, although the pompadoured, white-aproned siren sing-songs in his ear the praises of Irish stew, and pork with apple sauce.

Emma McChesney was eating her solitary supper at the Berger house at Three Rivers, Michigan. She had arrived at the Roast Beef haven many years before. She knew the digestive perils of a small town hotel dining-room as a guide on the snow-covered mountain knows each treacherous pitfall and chasm. Ten years on the road had taught her to recognize the deadly snare that lurks in the seemingly calm bosom of minced chicken with cream sauce. Not for her the impenetrable mysteries of a hamburger and onions. It had been a struggle, brief but terrible, from which Emma McChesney had emerged triumphant, her complexion and figure saved.

No more metaphor. On with the story, which left Emma at her safe and solitary supper.

She had the last number of the _Dry Goods Review_ propped up against the vinegar cruet and the Worcestershire, and the salt shaker. Between conscientious, but disinterested mouthfuls of medium roast beef, she was reading the snappy ad set forth by her firm's bitterest


Roast Beef, Medium - 1/28

    Next Page

  1    2    3    4    5    6   10   20   28 

Schulers Books Home



 Games Menu

Home
Balls
Battleship
Buzzy
Dice Poker
Memory
Mine
Peg
Poker
Tetris
Tic Tac Toe

Google
 
Web schulers.com
 

Schulers Books Online

books - games - software - wallpaper - everything