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- The Earth Trembled - 1/74 -


[Illustration: "Well Chile, Wot You Wants Ter Say?"]

The Works of E. P. Roe

_VOLUME FIFTEEN_

THE EARTH TREMBLED

ILLUSTRATED

CONTENTS

CHAPTER I MARY WALLINGFORD CHAPTER II LOVE'S AGONY CHAPTER III UNCLE SHEBA'S EXPERIENCE CHAPTER IV MARA CHAPTER V PAST AND FUTURE CHAPTER VI "PAHNASHIP" CHAPTER VII MARA'S PURPOSE CHAPTER VIII NEVER FORGET; NEVER FORGIVE CHAPTER IX A NEW SOLACE CHAPTER X MISS AINSLEY CHAPTER XI TWO QUESTIONS CHAPTER XII A "FABULATION" CHAPTER XIII CAPTAIN BODINE CHAPTER XIV "ALL GIRLS TOGETHER" CHAPTER XV TWO LITTLE BAKERS CHAPTER XVI HONEST FOES CHAPTER XVII FIRESIDE DRAMAS CHAPTER XVIII A FAIR DUELLIST CHAPTER XIX A CHIVALROUS SURPRISE CHAPTER XX THE STRANGER EXPLAINS CHAPTER XXI UNCLE SHEBA SAT UPON CHAPTER XXII YOUNG HOUGHTON IS DISCUSSED CHAPTER XXIII THE WARNING CHAPTER XXIV "THE IDEA!" CHAPTER XXV FEMININE FRIENDS CHAPTER XXVI ELLA'S CRUMB OF COMFORT CHAPTER XXVII RECOGNIZED AS LOVER CHAPTER XXVIII "HEAVEN SPEED YOU THEN" CHAPTER XXIX CONSTERNATION CHAPTER XXX TEMPESTS CHAPTER XXXI "I ABSOLVE YOU" CHAPTER XXXII FALSE SELF-SACRIFICE CHAPTER XXXIII A SURE TEST CHAPTER XXXIV "BITTERNESS MUST BE CHERISHED" CHAPTER XXXV NOBLE REVENGE CHAPTER XXXVI A FATHER'S FRENZY CHAPTER XXXVII CLOUDS LIFTING CHAPTER XXXVIII "YES, VILET" CHAPTER XXXIX THE EARTHQUAKE CHAPTER XL "GOD" CHAPTER XLI SCENES NEVER TO BE FORGOTTEN CHAPTER XLII A HOMELESS CITY CHAPTER XLIII "THE TERROR BY NIGHT" CHAPTER XLIV HOPE TURNED INTO DREAD CHAPTER XLV A CITY ENCAMPING CHAPTER XLVI "ON JORDAN'S BANKS WE STAN'" CHAPTER XLVII LIGHTS AND SHADOWS OF A NIGHT CHAPTER XLVIII GOOD BROUGHT OUT OF EVIL

THE EARTH TREMBLED

THE EARTH TREMBLED

CHAPTER I

MARY WALLINGFORD

At the beginning of the Civil War there was a fine old residence on Meeting Street in Charleston, South Carolina, inhabited by a family almost as old as the State. Its inheritor and owner, Orville Burgoyne, was a widower. He had been much saddened in temperament since the death of the wife, and had withdrawn as far as possible from public affairs. His library and the past had secured a stronger hold upon his interest and his thoughts than anything in the present, with one exception, his idolized and only child, Mary, named for her deceased mother. Any book would be laid aside when she entered; all gloom banished from his eyes when she coaxed and caressed him.

She was in truth one to be loved because so capable of love herself. She conquered and ruled every one not through wilfulness or imperiousness, but by a gentle charm, all her own, which disarmed opposition.

At first Mr. Burgoyne had paid little heed to the mutterings which preceded the Civil War, believing them to be but Chinese thunder, produced by ambitious politicians, North and South. He was preoccupied by the study of an old system of philosophy which he fancied possessed more truth than many a more plausible and modern one. Mary, with some fancy work in her hands, often watched his deep abstraction in wondering awe, and occasionally questioned him in regard to his thoughts and studies; but as his explanations were almost unintelligible, she settled down to the complacent belief that her father was one of the most learned men in the world.

At last swiftly culminating events aroused Mr. Burgoyne from his abstraction and drove him from his retirement. He accepted what he believed to be duty in profound sorrow and regret. His own early associations and those of his ancestors had been with the old flag and its fortunes; his relations to the political leaders of the South were too slight to produce any share in the alienation and misunderstandings which had been growing between the two great sections of his country, and he certainly had not the slightest sympathy with those who had fomented the ill-will for personal ends. Finally, however, he had found himself face to face with the momentous certainty of a separation of his State from the Union. For a time he was bewildered and disturbed beyond measure; for he was not a prompt man of affairs, living keenly in the present, but one who had been suddenly and rudely summoned from the academic groves of the old philosophers to meet the burning imperative questions of the day--questions put with the passionate earnestness of a people excited beyond measure.

It was this very element of popular feeling which finally turned the scale in his decision. Apparently the entire Southern people were unanimous in their determination "to be free" and to separate themselves from their old political relations. His pastor with all other friends of his own rank confirmed this impression, and, as it was known that he wavered, the best and strongest men of his acquaintance argued the question with him. His daughter was early carried away by the enthusiasm of her young companions, nevertheless she watched the conflict in her father's mind with the deepest interest. She often saw him walk the floor with unwonted tears in his eyes and almost agony on his brow; and when at last, he decided in accordance with the prevailing sentiment of his State, the Act of Secession and all that it involved became sacred in her thoughts.

She trembled and shrank when the phase of negotiation passed away, and war was seen to be the one alternative to submission. She never doubted or hesitated, however; neither did her father after his mind was once made up. Every day the torrent of bitter feeling deepened and broadened between them and the North, of which, practically, they knew very little. Even such knowledge as they possessed had come through distorted mediums, and now everything was colored by the blackest prejudice. They were led to believe and made to feel that not only their possessions but their life and honor were at stake. In early years Mr. Burgoyne had served with distinction in the war with Mexico, and he therefore promptly received a


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