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- The Adventures of a Boy Reporter - 1/23 -


The Adventures of a Boy Reporter

by Harry Steele Morrison, 1900

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

LIVING IN THE COUNTRY-- LIFE AT SCHOOL-- THE HUT CLUB IS FORMED-- THE COMING OF THE CIRCUS

CHAPTER II.

ARCHIE LONGS FOR A CHANGE IN SURROUNDINGS-- A TRIP TO NEW YORK WITH UNCLE HENRY

CHAPTER III.

ARCHIE DETERMINES TO GO TO THE CITY TO WORK-- LEAVING HOME AT NIGHT

CHAPTER IV.

WORKING ON A FARM TO EARN SOME MONEY-- CRUEL TREATMENT

CHAPTER V.

THE NIGHT AMONG THE RUINS-- THE CAMP-FIRE OF THE TRAMPS

CHAPTER VI.

STEALING A RIDE-- KICKED OUT BY THE BRAKEMAN

CHAPTER VII.

ARRIVAL IN NEW YORK-- A NIGHT IN A LODGING-HOUSE

CHAPTER VIII.

LOOKING FOR WORK-- WASHING DISHES IN A BOWERY RESTAURANT

CHAPTER IX.

IN THE STREET AGAIN-- THE POLICE STATION-- VISITS THE NEWSPAPER OFFICE, AND IS KINDLY RECEIVED BY THE EDITOR

CHAPTER X.

LIVING IN COMFORT AGAIN-- FEATURED AS "THE BOY REPORTER"

CHAPTER XI.

A DAY AND A NIGHT IN CONEY ISLAND-- RAIDING A GAMBLING DEN

CHAPTER XII.

A SUCCESSFUL REPORTER-- THE EDITOR DECIDES TO SEND HIM AS CORRESPONDENT TO THE PHILIPPINES-- LEAVING NEW YORK-- IN CHICAGO

CHAPTER XIII.

SAN FRANCISCO-- THE TRANSPORT GONE-- WORKING HIS WAY TO HONOLULU BY PEELING VEGETABLES ON A PACIFIC LINER-- THE CAPITAL OF HAWAII

CHAPTER XIV.

THE VOYAGE ON THE TRANSPORT-- A STORM AT SEA-- ARRIVAL IN MANILA

CHAPTER XV.

ARCHIE STARTS OUT ON AN EXPLORING TOUR, AND HAS SOME STRANGE ADVENTURES AMONG THE NATIVES-- SEIZED BY THE REBELS

CHAPTER XVI.

A PLEASANT CAPTOR-- BRAVE BILL HICKSON ALLOWS ARCHIE TO ESCAPE-- FIRST GLIMPSE OF AGUINALDO

CHAPTER XVII.

ARRIVAL OF THE AMERICAN TROOPS-- ARCHIE THE HERO OF THE REGIMENT

CHAPTER XVIII.

THE MARCH AFTER THE REBELS-- THE FIRST BATTLE-- ARCHIE WOUNDED

CHAPTER XIX.

RETURN TO MANILA-- IN THE HOSPITAL-- CONGRATULATED BY ALL-- WRITING TO THE PAPER OF HIS EXPERIENCES

CHAPTER XX.

AROUND THE ISLAND ON A WAR-SHIP-- BOMBARDING A FILIPINO TOWN

CHAPTER XXI.

CONTINUING THE CRUISE-- ANOTHER VILLAGE CAPTURED-- THE ADMIRAL ARCHIE'S FRIEND-- A GREAT BATTLE AND AN UNEXPECTED VICTORY-- LONGING TO BE HOME AGAIN

CHAPTER XXII.

RETURN TO HEADQUARTERS-- A LETTER FROM THE EDITOR, WITH PERMISSION TO RETURN TO NEW YORK-- BILL HICKSON GOES, TOO

CHAPTER XXIII.

HONG KONG-- A HAPPY TIME IN TOKIO-- HONOLULU AGAIN-- ARRIVAL IN SAN FRANCISCO, AND A GREAT RECEPTION BY THE PRESS-- ARCHIE AND BILL ARRIVE IN NEW YORK, AND ARE THE HEROES OF THE HOUR

CHAPTER XXIV.

DOING "SPECIAL" WORK UPON THE EVENING PAPER-- INTERVIEWS WITH FAMOUS MEN-- CALLS UPON OLD FRIENDS

CHAPTER XXV.

PRIVATE SECRETARY TO A MILLIONAIRE-- STUDYING AT EVENING SCHOOL-- LIVING AMID ELEGANT SURROUNDINGS

CHAPTER XXVI.

DECIDES TO VISIT HOME-- A GREAT RECEPTION IN THE TOWN-- A PUBLIC CHARACTER NOW-- DINNER TO THE HUT CLUB-- DEMONSTRATION AT THE TOWN HALL-- A TELEGRAM FROM HIS EMPLOYER LEAVING FOR EUROPE _________________________________________________________________

THE ADVENTURES OF A BOY REPORTER.

CHAPTER I.

LIVING IN THE COUNTRY-- LIFE AT SCHOOL-- THE HUT CLUB IS FORMED-- THE COMING OF THE CIRCUS.

"YES," said Mrs. Dunn to her neighbour, Mrs. Sullivan, "we are expecting great things of Archie, and yet we sometimes hardly know what to think of the boy. He has the most remarkable ideas of things, and there seems to be absolutely no limit to his ambition. He has long since determined that he will some day be President, and he expects to enter politics the day he is twenty-one."

"Is that so, indeed," said Mrs. Sullivan. "Well, we can never tell what is going to come of our boys. As I says to Dannie to-day, says I, 'Dannie, you must do your best to be somebody and make something of yourself, for you and Jack bees all that I has to depend upon now.' But Dannie pays no attention to my entreaties, and somehow it seems to me that since Mr. Sullivan died the boys are gettin' worse and worse. It's beyond me to control them, anyhow."

"Oh, take heart, Mrs. Sullivan," said Mrs. Dunn, "our boys will all turn out well in the end, and all we can do is to bring them up in the best way we know, and trust to them to take care of themselves after they leave home. Now Dannie is certainly an industrious lad. I hear him pounding nails all day long in the back yard, and he made a good job of shingling the woodshed the other day. He seems made to be a carpenter."

"Yes, I think so myself," said the Widow Sullivan. "The whole lot of them is out by the railroad now, building a hut. They've organised a 'Hut Club' to-day, and never a lick of work have I had out of them boys since mornin'. They've always got something going on, and when I want a bit of water from the well, or a little wood from the shed, they're never around."

"Yes, but boys will be boys, Mrs. Sullivan, and we'd better keep them contented at home as long as we can. They'll be leaving us soon enough. It seems that no boys are content to stay in town any longer; they're all anxious to be off to the city."

"That's true, that's true, Mrs. Dunn," said Mrs. Sullivan. "I must be going now. I'm much obliged for the rain-water, and whenever you want a bit of milk call over the fence, and I'll bring it to you with pleasure. It's a good neighbour you are, Mrs. Dunn."

And Mrs. Sullivan went slowly around the house and out at the front gate, while good Mrs. Dunn returned to her ironing, a few clothes having to be ready for Sunday.

While these mothers were discussing their boys, the youngsters themselves were busy behind the barn, building a hut down near the railway track. There were six of them altogether, the three extra ones, besides Archie Dunn and the Sullivan boys, having come from across the railway to play for the day. Two hours before they had solemnly organised themselves into the "Hut Club," each boy walking three times around the block blindfolded, and swearing upon his return to be true to all the rules and regulations of the organisation, which had been written with chalk on the side of the barn. The regulations were numerous, but the most important one was that no East Side boys were to be allowed within the club-room when it was built, and that the club's policy should be one of warfare against the East Siders on every occasion when they met. This fight against the East Side was, indeed, responsible for the organisation of the club. It was felt necessary to have some head to their forces, and some means of holding together. So the club was organised, and now the next thing on the programme was the erection of a hut to serve as a club-house. Archie Dunn, who had been elected president, volunteered to get three boards and a hammer if the other boys would each get two boards and some nails. This proposition was agreed to, and when the boys returned from


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