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- The Book of Good Manners - 1/54 -


THE BOOK OF GOOD MANNERS

A GUIDE TO POLITE USAGE FOR ALL SOCIAL FUNCTIONS

W. C. GREEN

THE BOOK OF GOOD MANNERS is a complete and authentic authority on every single phase of social usage as practiced in America. The author has compiled the matter in dictionary form in order to give the reader the desired information as briefly and clearly as possible, and with the least possible effort in searching through the pages.

ACCEPTING OR DECLINING INVITATIONS. See INVITATIONS, ACCEPTING OR DECLINING.

ACCIDENTS. See STREET ETIQUETTE--MEN--ACCIDENTS.

ADDRESS. The address of a person may be stamped on the stationery.

If the address is stamped, it is not customary to stamp also the crest or monogram.

ADDRESSING ENVELOPES.

MEN. A man should be addressed as Mr. James J, Wilson, or James J. Wilson, Esq. Either the Mr. or the Esq. may be used, but not the two together.

The title belonging to a man should be given. It is not customary to use Mr. or Esq. when Jr. or Sr. is used.

WOMEN. A woman's name should always have the Miss or Mrs.

A woman should never be given her husband's official title, as Mrs. Judge Wilson.

If a woman has a title of her own, she should be addressed as Dr. Minnie Wilson, when the letter is a professional one. If a social letter, this should be Miss Minnie Wilson, or Mrs. Minnie Wilson.

ADDRESSING PERSONS. Young girls should be spoken of as Minnie Wilson, and not as Miss Minnie, but are personally addressed as Miss Minnie. Only the greatest intimacy warrants a man in addressing a young girl as Minnie.

Parents should introduce their daughter as My daughter Minnie, but should speak of them before servants as Miss Minnie.

A married woman should be spoken of as Mrs. Agnes Wilson, and personally addressed as Mrs. Wilson.

ADDRESSING AND SIGNING LETTERS. All answers to invitations should be addressed to the party issuing them.

Letters to a woman who is a comparative stranger may begin My dear Mrs. Wilson, and to a closer acquaintance Dear Mrs. Wilson.

Letters to a man who is a comparative stranger may begin My dear Mr. Wilson, and to a closer acquaintance Dear Mr. Wilson.

For forms of addressing persons with titles, as Mayor, see under that title--as, Mayor, Governor.

The letters may end, Sincerely yours, or Very truly yours, or I remain yours with kindest regards.

The signature of a man should be John J. Wilson or J. Jones Wilson.

An unmarried woman should sign social letters as Minnie Wilson, and a business letter as Miss Minnie Wilson. A married woman should sign a social letter as Agnes Wilson. In signing a business letter, a married woman may either sign her name Mrs. Agnes Wilson, or, preferably,

Agnes Wilson (Mrs. John Wilson)

AFTERNOON CALLS. These should be made between three and half-past five, and if possible on regular at home days.

In making an afternoon call a man should wear the regulation afternoon dress.

DRESS--MEN. Afternoon dress consists of a double-breasted frock coat of dark material, and waistcoat, either single or double- breasted, of same, or of some fancy material of late design. The trousers should be of light color, avoiding of course extremes in patterns.

White or delicate color linen shirts should be worn, patent leather shoes, silk hat and undressed kid gloves of dark color.

Afternoon dress is worn at weddings, afternoon teas, receptions, garden parties, luncheons, church funerals, and at all afternoon functions.

See also EVENING DRESS--MEN. MORNING DRESS--MEN.

AFTERNOON RECEPTIONS. See AFTERNOON TEAS. GIVEN BY BACHELORS, See BACHELORS' TEAS.

AFTERNOON TEAS (FORMAL). These are very successful as a rule, due perhaps to their small expense and few exactions, and are given with many purposes: to introduce young women into society, to allow a hostess to entertain a number of her friends, to honor some woman of note, etc.

A formal afternoon tea is one for which cards have been issued, naming set date.

Awnings and carpet should be provided from curb to house. A man should be stationed at the curb to open carriage doors and call them when the guests leave, and another African Teas man should be in attendance at the front door to open it the moment a guest appears at the top step and to direct him to the dressing-room.

A policeman should be detailed for the occasion to keep back the onlookers, and should receive a small fee for his services.

At the door of the drawing-room a man should ask the name of each guest, which he announces as the latter enters. The hostess and those receiving with her should be just within the door to receive the guests.

CARDS. Each guest should leave a card in the tray in the hall.

A woman may leave the cards of the men of her family who have been unable to attend.

Cards should be sent by mail or messenger by those invited but unable to be present, and should be timed so that they reach the house during the function.

A husband and wife each send a card when the invitation is issued in the name of the hostess only, and two cards each when issued in the name of hostess and her daughter. If issued in the name of both husband and wife, a husband should send two and his wife should send one card.


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