Schulers Books Online

books - games - software - wallpaper - everything

Bride.Ru

Books Menu

Home
Author Catalog
Title Catalog
Sectioned Catalog

 

- The Minds and Manners of Wild Animals - 1/59 -


[Illustration with caption: OVERPOWERING CURIOSITY OF A MOUNTAIN SHEEP This "lava ram" stood thus on a lava crest in the Pinacate Mountains for about twenty minutes, gazing spellbound at two men and a pack mule. (See page 149)]

THE MINDS AND MANNERS OF WILD ANIMALS

A BOOK OF PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS

BY WILLIAM T. HORNADAY, Sc.D., A.M. DIRECTOR OF THE NEW YORK ZOOLOGICAL PARK. AUTHOR OF "THE AMERICAN NATURAL HISTORY," "TWO YEARS IN THE JUNGLE," "CAMP FIRES IN THE CANADIAN ROCKIES," "OUR VANISHING WILD LIFE," ETC.

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS

_The wild animal must think, or die._* * * * *

_"Prove all things; hold fast that which is good."_

COPYRIGHT, 1922, BY WILLIAM T. HORNADAY

Printed in the United States of America

_The right of translation is reserved_

Published May, 1922

TO THE OFFICERS AND MEN OF THE NEW YORK ZOOLOGICAL PARK, WHOSE SAFETY DEPENDS UPON THEIR KNOWLEDGE OF THE MINDS OF WILD ANIMALS, THIS VOLUME IS DEDICATED AS A TOKEN OF APPRECIATION AND REGARD

CONTENTS

I. A SURVEY OF THE FIELD

I. THE LAY OF THE LAND II. WILD ANIMAL TEMPERAMENT & INDIVIDUALITY III. THE LANGUAGE OF ANIMALS IV. THE MOST INTELLIGENT ANIMALS V. THE RIGHTS OF WILD ANIMALS

II. MENTAL TRAITS OF WILD ANIMALS

VI. THE BRIGHTEST MINDS AMONG ANIMALS VII. KEEN BIRDS AND DULL MEN VIII. THE MENTAL STATUS OF THE ORANG-UTAN IX. THE MAN-LIKENESS OF THE CHIMPANZEE X. THE TRUE MENTAL STATUS OF THE GORILLA XI. THE MIND OF THE ELEPHANT XII. THE MENTAL AND MORAL TRAITS OF BEARS XIII. MENTAL TRAITS OF A FEW RUMINANTS XIV. MENTAL TRAITS OF A FEW RODENTS XV. THE MENTAL TRAITS OF BIRDS XVI. THE WISDOM OF THE SERPENT XVII. THE TRAINING OF WILD ANIMALS

III. THE HIGHER PASSIONS

XVIII. THE MORALS OF WILD ANIMALS XIX. THE LAWS OF THE FLOCKS AND HERDS XX. PLAYS AND PASTIMES OF WILD ANIMALS XXI. COURAGE IN WILD ANIMALS

IV. THE BASER PASSIONS

XXII. FEAR AS A RULING PASSION XXIII. FIGHTING AMONG WILD ANIMALS XXIV. WILD ANIMAL CRIMINALS AND CRIME XXV. FIGHTING WITH WILD ANIMALS

THE CURTAIN.

PREFACE

During these days of ceaseless conflict, anxiety and unrest among men, when at times it begins to look as if "the Caucasian" really is "played out," perhaps the English-reading world will turn with a sigh of relief to the contemplation of wild animals. At all events, the author has found this diversion in his favorite field mentally agreeable and refreshing.

In comparison with some of the alleged men who now are cursing this earth by their baneful presence, the so-called "lower animals" do not seem so very "low" after all! As a friend of the animals, this is a very proper time in which to compare them with men. Furthermore, if thinking men and women desire to know the leading facts concerning the intelligence of wild animals, it will be well to consider them now, before the bravest and the best of the wild creatures of the earth go down and out under the merciless and inexorable steam roller that we call Civilization.

The intelligence and the ways of wild animals are large subjects. Concerning them I do not offer this volume as an all-in-all production. Out of the great mass of interesting things that might have been included, I have endeavored to select and set forth only enough to make a good series of sample exhibits, without involving the general reader in a hopelessly large collection of details. The most serious question has been: What shall be left out?

Mr. A. R. Spofford, first Librarian of Congress, used to declare that "Books are made from books"; but I call the reader to bear witness that this volume is not a mass of quotations. A quoted authority often can be disputed, and for this reason the author has found considerable satisfaction in relying chiefly upon his own testimony.

Because I always desire to know the _opinions_ of men who are writing upon their own observations, I have felt free to express my own conclusions regarding the many phases of animal intelligence as their manifestation has impressed me in close-up observations.

I have purposely avoided all temptations to discuss the minds and manners of domestic animals, partly because that is by itself a large subject, and partly because their minds have been so greatly influenced by long and close association with man. The domestic mammals and birds deserve independent treatment.

A great many stories of occurrences have been written into this volume, for the purpose of giving the reader all the facts in order that he may form his own opinions of the animal mentality displayed.

Most sincerely do I wish that the boys and girls of America, and of the whole world, may be induced to believe that _the most interesting thing about a wild animal is its mind and its reasoning,_ and that a dead animal is only a poor decaying thing. If the feet of the young men would run more to seeing and studying the wild creatures and less to the killing of them, some of the world's valuable species might escape being swept away tomorrow, or the day after.

The author gratefully acknowledges his indebtedness to Munsey's Magazine, McClure's Magazine and the Sunday Magazine Syndicate for permission to copy herein various portions of his chapters from those publications.

W. T. H.

The Anchorage, Stamford, Conn. December 19, 1921.

ILLUSTRATIONS

Overpowering Curiosity of a Mountain Sheep Christmas at the Primates' House The Trap-Door Spider's Door and Burrow Hanging Nest of the Baltimore Oriole Great Hanging Nests of the Crested Cacique "Rajah," the Actor Orang-Utan Thumb-Print of an Orang-Utan The Lever That Our Orang-Utan Invented Portrait of a High-Caste Chimpanzee The Gorilla With the Wonderful Mind Tame Elephants Assisting in Tying a Wild Captive Wild Bears Quickly Recognize Protection Alaskan Brown Bear, "Ivan," Begging for Food The Mystery of Death The Steady-Nerved and Courageous Mountain Goat Fortress of an Arizona Pack-Rat Wild Chipmunks Respond to Man's Protection An Opossum Feigning Death Migration of the Golden Plover. (Map) Remarkable Village Nests of the Sociable Weaver Bird Spotted Bower-Bird, at Work on Its Unfinished Bower Hawk-Proof Nest of a Cactus Wren A Peace Conference With an Arizona Rattlesnake Work Elephant Dragging a Hewn Timber The Wrestling Bear, "Christian," and His Partner Adult Bears at Play Primitive Penguins on the Antarctic Continent, Unafraid of Man Richard W. Rock and His Buffalo Murderer


The Minds and Manners of Wild Animals - 1/59

    Next Page

  1    2    3    4    5    6   10   20   30   40   50   59 

Schulers Books Home



 Games Menu

Home
Balls
Battleship
Buzzy
Dice Poker
Memory
Mine
Peg
Poker
Tetris
Tic Tac Toe

Google
 
Web schulers.com
 

Schulers Books Online

books - games - software - wallpaper - everything